CORSAC FOX

Corsac fox, or steppe fox 

IThe Corsac fox is a long legged, reddish gray fox with large ears and a short, pointy face. Its coat is grayish-red with silver undertones, and the under parts are white with yellow undertones. Its chin is also white. They have small teeth compared to other foxes. The Corsac Fox is slightly smaller than the red fox and as tall as an average sized dog. Length of the head and body  of 45 to 65 cm (18 to 26 in), and a tail 19 to 35 cm (7.5 to 13.8 in) long. Adults weigh from 1.6 to 3.2 kilograms (3.5 to 7.1 lb).

It has grey to yellowish fur over much of the body, with paler underparts and pale markings on the mouth, chin, and throat. During the winter, the coat becomes much thicker and silkier in texture, and is straw-grey in colour, with a darker line running down the back.

Corsac fox has small teeth and wide head. It has excellent eyesight and sense of hearing and smell. These senses are used to facilitate detection of the prey and predators.

Features

Behavior:

In the wild, the corsac fox is reportedly nocturnal. Interestingly, they remain active all day in captivity. These foxes are good climbers; however, their running speed is moderate, and hence, can easily be caught by a slow dog.

They have excellent senses of vision, hearing, and smell. These foxes are nomadic in nature. They do not maintain a fixed range of their homes, but instead, they migrate southward in the chilly months of winter especially because, during this time, hunting is tough due to ice and deep snow.

In the winter, these canids build small hunting packs often consisting of mated pairs and their growing offspring. Corsac foxes are more social compared to other fox species. Many individuals are seen living together along with other foxes in either a common or adjoining burrows, resembling ‘corsac cities’.

Corsac foxes often acquire their burrows from other animals like marmots, badgers, ground squirrels, etc. The burrows that they excavate are usually shallow and simple. These animals catch their prey using a typical style by leaping into the air and dropping down on it. Such action reduces the chances of escaping.

The corsac fox is a carnivore and seems to favor rodents as a main item in the diet. They also consume large quantitities of insects, some pikas, birds and plant material. The teeth are small. They catch rodents using a characteristic style of leaping into the air, then dropping down on prey so they have less of a chance to escape. Their broad ears help them locate rustles that indicate presence of a rodent.

Habitat:

The corsac fox is an inhabitant of steppes and semi-desert. It avoids areas used for agricultural purposes, forests, and thickets. It lives in adjoining burrows that were dug by other animals, then taken over by the fox.
In the wild, the corsac fox is reportedly nocturnal. Interestingly, they remain active all day in captivity. These foxes are good climbers; however, their running speed is moderate, and hence, can easily be caught by a slow dog.

Methods of hunting permitted for use:

  • stalking,
  • ambush hunting,
  • trapping (automatic trap),
  • using hunting dogs

Permitted hunting tools:

Hunting fire smooth-bore long-barreled arms; firearm with a rifled barrel of caliber no more than 8 mm and a seating distance not more than 51 mm (including a caliber of 5.6 mm for a rim-fire cartridge); hunting firearm combined weapons (smooth-bore and rifted gun). Including with rebarreling and auxiliary rifled barrels of 5.6 mm caliber for rim-fire cartridge; traps (automatic traps), including deadfalls of various types, mole traps, cherkans (wooden traps for animals living in lodges), gin traps, snares, and other analogues of automatic traps, as well as nets, cages, live traps and etc; cold bladed hunting weapon. It is allowed to use a hunting pneumatic weapon with a muzzle energy of no more than 25 J for taking a chipmunk, ground squirrel, ground squirrel, hamster, water vole.

Fur

Fluffy, full-bodied, warm. Plush yet lightweight. Long, lustrous guard hairs

Hugely popular fur is the luxuriously full-furred fox. With long, lustrous guard hairs and a soft, thick underfur, fox is wonderfully fluffy and ideal for high-fashion trim on collars, cuffs, wraps, headbands—you name it, fox fur makes everything lusciously warm and beautiful. Fox fur boasts an unusually wide range of natural colorings, and can also be dyed in a variety of colors for stylistic effect.